B – Dictionary

B…

B String The second string of the guitar. See How to Change Classical  Guitar Strings

Classical Guitar Barre 2

B1, B2, B3, B4

 

B1, B2, B3, B4, …… A single finger holding multiple strings on a stringed instrument  at the same time. Symbol used in standard notation for guitar. Number indicates which fret. Example: B7 (C7, CVII, VII) See Barre

Ba…

Bachata a genre from the Dominican Republic that is played with guitars and percussion, usually with lyrics that focus on love,treachery, jealousy and desperation

Back & Sides The main wood pieces of the back and sides of a guitar. Traditionally the Back & Sides of the Classical Guitar was commonly made of solid book-matched Rosewood, Mahogany or Cypress, but today’s builders have opened their horizons to a wide variety choices. See Wood Choices for Back & Sides See Alternative Wood Choices for Back & Sides See Anatomy of a Classical Guitar

Classical Guitar Back Braces

Back Braces Generally made of spruce, braces add stiffness to the back of a classical guitar. The wood chosen is very straight grained running the length of the brace. See Anatomy of a Classical Guitar

Backbeat a continuous heavy accent on beats 2 and 4 in jazz and rock and roll music

Backfall a descending appoggiatura

Back-plucked string plucked far from the nut thus producing a round and flutelike tone

Badinage (French) playfulness; a quick eighteenth-century piece in 2/4 time

Badinerie (French) playfulness; a quick eighteenth-century piece in 2/4 time

Bagana a large eight to ten-string Ethiopian plucked lyre with a trapezoidal wooden frame

Bägänna a large eight to ten-string Ethiopian plucked lyre with a trapezoidal wooden frame

Bagatelle (French, German) trifle, unpretentious; a short, light instrumental piece of music of no specified form, usually for piano

Baglama a long-necked Turkish lute, with a pear shaped body, also found in Greece

Baile (Spanish) dance or ballet; flamenco dance

Bailecito typical festive Bolivian handkerchief dance

Baion a slow samba rhythm from Brazil

Baisser (French) to lower

Bajo (Spanish) low, deep

 

Bajo

 

Bajo quinto a Mexican ten-string guitar

Bajo sexton a Mexican twelve-string guitar

 

Bakelite  phenol plastic; but now usually covers a range of different types of plastic

Baksimba a royal dance of the Baganda people from Uganda

Balalaika

 

Balalaika a triangular guitar-like instrument with a fretted finger-board normally bearing three strings of Russian origin

 

Balance The adjustment of volume and timbre between instruments or voices so that, when required, each is clearly heard through the general texture. A Harmonious or satisfying arrangement or proportion of parts or elements.

Ballabile (Italian) in a dance style, to be danced

Ballad a narrative song, often sentimental, with verses alternating with a refrain

Ballade thirteenth-, fourteenth- and fifteenth-century formes fixes, a strophic piece, each stanza having an initial repeated section followed by a second section played only once, and a final refrain; a dramatic heroic piano piece often inspired by poetry; a setting of a poem to music

Balladenmässig (German) in the style of a ballad

Ballet a dance form, originally Italian, established at the French court in the sixteenth century, formal and courtly, originally danced both by professionals and guests but now danced by professionals

Ballo (Italian) a ball, dance

Bambera a flamenco singing style known as swing songs

Bambuca the national dance of Colombia, South America

Banatanka a Serbian dance

Band (English) a group of instrumental players

Band (German) volume

Bandari dance-like instrumental music from Iran

Bände (German) volumes

Bandola of the cittern family, Spanish with six pairs of strings

Bandolín small South American Creole lute, pear shaped, and with a fretted neck, that comes in various sizes and ranges and has from 8 to 15 steel strings

Bandolim Portuguese mandolin

Bandora a plucked string instrument of the lute family, popular both as a solo and as an accompanying instrument to songs of the sixteenth- and seventeenth-centuries, the bandora is a bass register instrument with six or seven metal strings, a long, fretted neck, and a scalloped body

Bandore of the cittern family, Spanish with six pairs of strings

Bandura a fretless plucked dulcimer found in the Ukraine, with a short neck, an oval flat body and which is held vertically

Bandurria small 12-string mandolin-type instrument, played with a pick, with a very short wide neck and 14 metal frets, popular in Spain and Spanish America

Bandurria sonora a bandurria with 6 metal strings instead of guts strings

Banjo a plucked, four to nine wire occasionally gut  strung instrument, the strings lying on a low bridge over a resonator made of a metal hoop, popular in early jazz and country music

Banjolele a ukulele-banjo

Banjolin a mandolin-banjo

Bansango (West African) dance rhythm for young women

Bar a vertical line used to metrically divide music into groups of beats see Staff, Barline, & Clef

Barbat Persian ud

Barber-shop harmony a popular, banal style of close harmony singing, originally all male, begun in the US in the late nineteenth-century

Barcarola (Italian)  a song or instrumental piece associated with boats and boating generally in compound duple (6/8) or compound quadruple (12/8)

Barcarolle (French) a song or instrumental piece associated with boats and boating generally in compound duple (6/8) or compound quadruple (12/8)

Barcaruola (Italian) a song or instrumental piece associated with boats and boating generally in compound duple (6/8) or compound quadruple (12/8)

Bariolage (French) rapid alternation of open and stopped strings on the violin

Baritone Clef See clef in Staff, Barline, & Clef

Barkarole (German) a song or instrumental piece associated with boats and boating generally in compound duple (6/8) or compound quadruple (12/8)

Barline a vertical line drawn across the staff to mark off measures of a particular length, containing a number of notes whose total time value is set by the time signature see Staff, Barline, & Clef see Elements of Standard Notation for Classical Guitar  see Elements of Tablature for Classical Guitar

Barn dances barn dances are the product of the colonial United States of America. Early Americans recreated them from England’s country dances. They were performed in halls and barns as get-togethers among North America’s first social gatherings

Barocco (Italian) bizarre, a very clearly definable type or genre of European music from the period c. 1580 to c. 1730

Barok (German) bizarre, a very clearly definable type or genre of European music from the period c. 1580 to c. 1730

Baroque (French) bizarre, a very clearly definable type or genre of European music from the period c. 1580 to c. 1730

Baroque dance the baroque style of dance evolved during the middle of the seventeenth-century

Baroque guitar an early form of the modern guitar, normally double strung with five courses unlike the six single strings on the modern instrument

Barre (French) a device that clamps to the neck of a plucked string instrument  and which change its tuning by shortening the sounding length of every string see Barre see Elements of Standard Notation for Classical Guitar 

Barrios Mangore, Agustin (1885-1944) see Classical Guitarists and Composers

Basese popular Malagasy dance rhythm from Diego Suárez

Bas instruments soft instruments suitable for chamber music

Baskiche Tänze (German) Basque dance

Basques a term applied to rhythmically complex dance music of Basque origin

Bass Strings The wound strings on a guitar. The fourth, fifth, & sixth strings. See How to Change Classical  Guitar Strings

Bass bar a strip of wood glued under the belly of a sound board to support one foot of the bridge and to improve the instrument’s bass frequency resonant response

Bass fiddle double bass 

Bassa (Italian) low, deep, bass

Basse (French) bass

Basse dance a very early dance type, in which the feet are kept close to the ground

Bassi (Italian) low, deep, basses

Basso (Italian) low, deep, bass

Basso continuo figured bass

Bassoon à serpentine (French) racket

Basso ostinato ground bass, a pattern repeated several times over in the bass line to accompany one or more ever-varying upper parts

Bass-saite (German) the bottom string on a bowed or plucked instrument

Bassus the lowest part in a polyphonic composition

Battaglia (Italian) a piece suggesting a battle

Battre (French) to beat time

Battuta (Italian) a beat; a bar or measure

Battuta, A (Italian) a tempo, return to the original speed

Batucada Afro-Brazilian jam sessions

Batuque Afro-Brazilian jam sessions

Bayle (Spanish) dance or ballet; flamenco dance

Bb…

B.B.C. British Broadcasting Corporation

Be…

Be (German) the flat sign

Beam A part of a note. see beam in Elements of a Musical Score

Beam Grouping Notes beamed in groups in a manor to distinguish the beats in a measure. see Elements of Standard Notation for Classical Guitar  see Elements of Tablature for Classical Guitar

Bearbeit (German) arranged

Bearbitung (German) arrangement

Bearclaw A wood grain pattern. Like it sounds, it looks like a bear used a tree to sharpen its claws and left nonsymmetrical small waves in the grain. Once considered inferior because of appearance, it’s now sought after because of its increase in density. Bearclaw tops have become popular on bluegrass guitars and may be seen as an alternative in Classical Guitar construction. See Anatomy of a Classical Guitar

Beat rhythmic pulse in a piece of music; a throbbing or undulating effect taking place in rapid succession when two notes not quite of the same pitch are sounded together

Beaucoup (French) much

Bebend (German) trembling, tremolo

Bebop a complex 1940’s jazz style, characterized by very fast or very slow tempos with improvised lines of notes, irregular accents, and extended harmony, the patterns often ending with an abrupt two-note figure that sounded like be-bop

Bécarre (French) the natural sign

Becuadro (Spanish) natural sign

Bedächtig (German) careful

Bedarfsfall, Im (German) in case of need

Bedautend (German) considerable

Begeistert (German) inspired, enthused

Begeisterung (German) inspiration, exaltation

Begleiten (German) to accompany

Begleitung (German) accompaniment

Begleitend (German) accompanying

Behaglich (German) agreeably

Behend (German) nimbly

Behendigkeit (German) nimbleness

Beherzt (German) courageous

Behind the beat when a performer deliberately sounds the notes slightly after the beat set by the ensemble

Beide (German) both

Beinahe (German) almost

Beispiel (German) example

Beisser (German) mordant

Beklemmt (German) oppressed

Beklommen (German) oppressed

Belebend (German) animating

Belebt (German) animated

Belebter (German) more animated

Beleiben, Nach (German) at will, at your pleasure, ad lib

Beleibig (German) optional

Bellicosamente (Italian) warlike

Bellicoso (Italian) warlike

Belly the upper surface of a stringed instrument on which the bridge rests, also called the table

Belustigend (German) amusing

Bémol (French) a sign which lowers the pitch of a note by one semitone

Bemol (Spanish) a sign which lowers the pitch of a note by one semitone

Bemolle (Italian) a sign which lowers the pitch of a note by one semitone

Benda change in the pitch of a note for expressive purposes, so named because on the guitar the effect is produced, literally, by bending the string

Ben (Italian) well, much

Ben marcato (Italian) well marked, accented

Ben tenuto (Italian) well held

Bene (Italian) well, much

Benedictus the second part of the Sanctus of the Mass

Beneplacimento (Italian) when preceded by A suo the phrase means ad lib

Beneplacito (Italian) when preceded by A suo the phrase means ad lib

Benga Kenyan Luo pop music

Bent Sides The sides of a guitar so named because they are bent to shape. See Wood Choices for Back & Sides See Alternative Wood Choices for Back & Sides See Anatomy of a Classical Guitar

Bequadro (Italian) the sign placed before a note that is neither sharpened or flattened

Bequem (German) comfortable

Bercement (French) rocking, lulling, swaying

Berceuse (French) a lullaby or instrumental piece in compound duple, 6/8 time

Berda Croatian fretted bass

Bereite vor (German) prepare, make ready

Bereits (German) already, previously

Bergamasca (Italian) a sixteenth- and seventeenth-century dance originally from Bergamo, then in simple duple time, but now associated with a wider range of time signatures

Bergomask (German) a sixteenth- and seventeenth-century dance originally from Bergamo, then in simple duple time, but now associated with a wider range of time signatures

Bergamasque (French) a sixteenth- and seventeenth-century dance originally from Bergamo, then in simple duple time, but now associated with a wider range of time signatures

Bergerette (French) a shepherd’s song

Beruhigen (German) to make restful

Beruhigend (German) becoming restful

Beruhigt (German) become restful

Beruhigter (German) more restful

Beruhigung (German) calming

Bes (German) the note B double flat

Beschleunigen (German) to speed up

Beschleunigt (German) to speed up

Beseelt (German) animated

Bestimmt (German) prominent, in a decided style

Betend (German) praying

Betont (German) stressed, emphasized, accentuated

Betonung (German) accentuation

Betrübnis (German) sadness

Betrübt (German)   saddened

Beweglich (German) agile

Beweglichkeit (German) agility 

Bewegt (German) speeded

Bewegter (German) quicker

Bh…

Bewegung (German) speed

Bhajan Indian devotional song

Bhangra beat a popular hybrid of traditional Indian music fused with late twentieth-century pop

Bi…

Bianca (Italian) a half note

Bicinium a song for two voices

Bien (French) well, very

Big Daddy and Authorized Personnel famous blues band of the Midwest, also known as Authorizes Personnel

Bigleaf A distinctive wood grain pattern. See Wood Choices for Back & Sides See Alternative Wood Choices for Back & Sides See Anatomy of a Classical Guitar

Bigleaf Maple  Bigleaf is a distinctive wood grain pattern. Maple is known for its figured grain, particularly “curly” or “flamed” wood exhibiting the tight even curls of “fiddleback” figure, as well as “birds-eye” and “quilted” or “blister” figure. European Maple is between Rock Maple and Bigleaf in hardness, and is fine and even-textured. Bigleaf Maple is a bit coarser and harder to work. It can range in color from ivory, to pink, to tan. Quilted Maple is the hardest to obtain. See Wood Choices for Back & Sides See Alternative Wood Choices for Back & Sides See Anatomy of a Classical Guitar

Bikutsi a rhythmic style which originated with the Beti people of present day Cameroon, Originally associated with war, the shedding of blood and calls for vengeance against other groups

Bin Indian plucked lute

Binary form a musical form made up of two sections sometimes termed A and B

Binary measure two beats in a bar or measure

Birch Carbuncle Burl An alternative wood for the back and sides of a classical guitar. See Wood Choices for Back & Sides See Alternative Wood Choices for Back & Sides See Anatomy of a Classical Guitar

Bird’s eye A fermata

Bis (French) repeat, encore, play again

Bis (German) until

Bisbigliato (Italian) whispered

Biscroma (Italian) a thirty-second note see Note Values

Bitonal where two keys are used simultaneously, originating from the use of modes, common in pre-baroque, folk-style and more modern works

Bitonality where two keys are used simultaneously, originating from the use of modes, common in pre-baroque, folk-style and more modern works

Bittend (German) entreating

Biwa a short-necked Japanese lute, used in the seventh-century in gagaku, with a cranked neck.  played with an oversized plectrum. The number of frets varies from 4 to 6 and the number of strings vary in number from 3 to 5 but there are usually 4

Biwagaku (Japanese) music played on the biwa

Bizzarro (Italian) bizarre, whimsical

Bl…

Black Acacia Black Acacia a is honey brown or golden brown in color wood with straight grain. It is an excellent alternative to the rosewoods with a luminescence and depth similar to mahogany. Though from Northern California, Africa and India, the best Black Acacia is from Australia. see Wood Choices for Back & Sides See Alternative Wood Choices for Back & Sides see Anatomy of a Classical Guitar 

Black & White Ebony An alternative wood for the back and sides of a classical guitar. see Wood Choices for Back & Sides see Alternative Wood Choices for Back & Sides see Anatomy of a Classical Guitar

Black Bottom a quick-tempo dance, characterized by a shaking or wiggling of the body

Black Palm An alternative wood for the back and sides of a classical guitar. See Wood Choices for Back & Sides See Alternative Wood Choices for Back & Sides See Anatomy of a Classical Guitar

Blanche (French) a half note see Note Values

Bleiben (German) to remain

Bleibt (German) remains

Block chords where the notes of the entire chord are played simultaneously and structured accordingly in succession

Bloodwood An alternative wood for the back and sides of a classical guitar. See Wood Choices for Back & Sides See Alternative Wood Choices for Back & Sides See Anatomy of a Classical Guitar

Bloss (German) mere, merely

Blue grass form of country & western music that developed during the mid 1940’s, played by groups that include a double bass, two or more guitars, mandolins, fiddles, steel or Hawaiian guitars, dobros and five-string banjo

Blue notes flattened third, seventh and occasionally fifth degrees of the major scale

Blues Scale see Musical Scales

Bo…

Bocca chiusa (Italian) wordless humming

Boceto (Spanish) sketch

Bocote A wood from Central America that features a tobacco/reddish brown color with distinct, parallel black lines. It’s less brittle than Ziricote. See Wood Choices for Back & Sides See Alternative Wood Choices for Back & Sides See Anatomy of a Classical Guitar

Body the resonance box of a stringed instrument. See Wood Choices for Back & Sides See Alternative Wood Choices for Back & Sides See Anatomy of a Classical Guitar

Bog (German) tie or bind

Bogen (German) tie or bind

Boiled Linseed Raw linseed oil with chemical accelerators, called driers, added to quicken drying time. Often used on bare fingerboards to prevent cracking. See Dressing the Frets on a Classical Guitar See How to Change Classical  Guitar Strings 

Bolerito a triple meter dance but includes only one or two sections or movements as compared with the standard three in a bolero

Bolero Spanish dance in 3/4 time; Cuban dance derived from the Spanish bolero, initially into 2/4 time then eventually into 4/4, but always slow

Bolombatto harp from West Africa with four gut strings over a gourd resonator and an attached tin rattle

Bolon a three string bass harp with a resonating gourd that can be used as a drum

Boloye one-string bass from the Ivory Coast

Bomb in jazz and particularly in bop, an unexpectedly loud beat from the drummer on a backbeat, upbeat or irregular eighth note beat

Bone A material used for making bridge saddles and fingerboard nuts. See The  Classical  Guitar Fingerboard Nut See Anatomy of a Classical Guitar

Boogie woogie a blues style of music which evolved in the Mississippi basin of the Deep South of the U.S.A

Book Matched Two wood pieces (cut from a single piece and reoriented) that mirror each other in grain. See Wood Choices for Back & Sides See Alternative Wood Choices for Back & Sides See Anatomy of a Classical Guitar

Bop a complex 1940’s jazz style, characterized by very fast or very slow tempos with improvised lines of notes, irregular accents, and extended harmony, the patterns often ending with an abrupt two-note figure that sounded like be-bop

Borre (English) a French dance similar to the gavotte but beginning on the fourth beat of four rather than the third of four as in the gavotte

Borree (English) a French dance similar to the gavotte but beginning on the fourth beat of four rather than the third of four as in the gavotte

Borrowed chord use of a chord in a key in which it is not diatonic, or the substitution of a chord from a different key into a work

Borrowed division a term used to describe when a note is divided into an unusual number of smaller notes, for example, when three quarter notes are to be played in the time of a half note

Borry (English) a French dance similar to the gavotte but beginning on the fourth beat of four rather than the third of four as in the gavotte

Bossa nova a Brazilian popular music style developed in the late 1950s

Bottleneck guitar a slide guitar, where a smooth, hard object, usually a hollow metal or glass cylinder, is used to change the pitches of the strings

Bouffe (French) comic

Bourrée a French dance similar to the gavotte but beginning on the fourth beat (of four) rather than the third (of four) as in the gavotte

Bout (French) end

Boutade (French) an improvisation

Bouts the curves in the sides of the instrument, especially the C-shaped inward curves that form the waist

Bouzouki a twentieth-century long-necked Greek lute with a fretted neck and a pear shaped body containing two courses of strings which are tuned like the upper strings of a guitar

Box Elder Burl An alternative wood for the back and sides of a classical guitar. See Wood Choices for Back & Sides See Alternative Wood Choices for Back & Sides See Anatomy of a Classical Guitar

Boyau (French) catgut, made from the intestines of sheep, lambs or goat

Bp…

Bpm beats per minute, the usual measurement of tempo

Br…

Braccio (Italian) of the arm

Brace a rustic dance in duple time, similar to the gavotte, originating in France

Braces Strips of wood attached to the inner top or back of a guitar to increase strength. See Anatomy of a Classical Guitar

Bracket a perpendicular line with bracket joining multiple staves

Branle (French) a rustic dance in duple time, similar to the gavotte, originating in France

Bransle (French) a rustic dance in duple time, similar to the gavotte, originating in France

Brantle a rustic dance in duple time, similar to the gavotte, originating in France

Bras (French) arm

Brautlied (German) bridal song

Bravoure (French) bravery, gallantry

Bravoure (French) skill, spirit

Bravura (Italian) skill, spirit

Brawl a rustic dance in duple time, similar to the gavotte, originating in France  

Brawle a rustic dance in duple time, similar to the gavotte, originating in France  

Brazilian Leopard Wood An alternative wood for the back and sides of a classical guitar. See Wood Choices for Back & Sides See Alternative Wood Choices for Back & Sides See Anatomy of a Classical Guitar

Break provides a solo instrumentalist, usually the leader of a jazz or Blue Grass group, to play without the rest of the ensemble

Break-In Time The classical guitar consists of approximately 40 major wooden parts, all glued together to hold their idle state. If the instrument vibrates regularly at set frequencies, these glue joints will open in such a way that the top, back and sides will eventually begin to vibrate more freely with notable improvements in tone, response, dynamic range, and volume. An average break-in time for a new guitar can take one to two years. For a professional, one to two months with huge improvements in weeks! See How to Change Classical  Guitar Strings

Breakdance originating from the hip-hop movement, it consists of jerky rhythmic patterns, smooth linear robot-like movements, syncopation and helicopter spins with the dancer on the floor on his or her back

Breathing a term applied to the performance of music on all instruments indicating all silences between sounds

Breath mark where, by use of a mark like a large comma or apostrophe placed above the stave, the composer requests that the performer break the musical line, so producing the desired phrase shape see Breath mark in Phrasing Symbols

Breit (German) largo, broad

Breve (Italian) a double whole note see Note Values

Briarwood Burl An alternative wood for the back and sides of a classical guitar. See Wood Choices for Back & Sides See Alternative Wood Choices for Back & Sides See Anatomy of a Classical Guitar

Bridge The B section of an A-A-B-A song form.

Bridge Through the saddle, a wood bridge transfers the vibrating energy of the string to the top of the guitar. see How to Change Classical  Guitar Strings see Anatomy of a Classical Guitar

Bridge Plate The Bridge Plate adds strength to the top under the bridge area. The straight wood grain runs perpendicular to the top of the guitar. see Anatomy of a Classical Guitar

Bridge Saddle Typically made of bone, the saddle transfers the vibrating energy of the string to the top of the guitar. The bridge saddle is not glued to the bridge, but rather held in place by the tension of the strings. The height of the saddle is determined by the guitars neck angle, therefore it is not measured upon itself but rather measured for an optimal string height at at the twelfth fret. Traditionally the bass strings are higher than the trebles, but crossover players are setting their heights more equal. see Anatomy of a Classical Guitar

Bridge Saddle Height The height of the string at the twelfth fret measured from the top of the fret to the bottom of the string as adjusted at the bridge saddle.

Bridge Tie Block The area on a classical guitar bridge where the strings are tied. Often a strong cosmetic veneer is added. This adds character to the bridge, but also prevents the strings from marring into the bridge. see How to Change Classical  Guitar Strings see Anatomy of a Classical Guitar

Brillant (French) brilliant, bright, sparkling, with verve and vivacity

Brillante (French) brilliant, bright, sparkling, with verve and vivacity

Brillante (Italian) brilliant, bright, sparkling, with verve and vivacity

Brindisi a drinking song

Brio (Italian) free, spirit

Brioso (Italian) spirited

Brisé (French) broken, as in arpeggiation

Brokel dantza Basque combat dance

Broken chord an arpeggiated chord where the notes are played one after the other

Broken consort an ensemble consisting of several different kinds of instruments

Broken In Anyone who has owned a new guitar will attest that it requires a certain amount of time to improve its tone. A small amount is attributed to the aging of the wood, but the greatest single event contributing to improved tone of an instrument as it ages is its ability to learn to vibrate at frequencies that will most often be used. The classical guitar consists of approximately 40 major wooden parts, all glued together to hold their idle state. If the instrument vibrates regularly at set frequencies, these glue joints will open in such a way that the top, back and sides will eventually begin to vibrate more freely with notable improvements in tone, response, dynamic range, and volume (Sweet Spots). An average break-in time for a new guitar can take one to two years. For a professional, one to two months with huge improvements in weeks! see How to Change Classical  Guitar Strings 

Broken octaves where alternate notes are played an octave apart

Broken time the interposition of short sections (general only a bar or two) in a contrasting time signature; unusual time signatures that can be unsettling to a less experienced player, for example 7/8 or 13/16

Bruscamente (Italian) brusquely, short and abruptly

Bu…

Buccolico (Italian) rustic

Bucolico (Italian) rustic

Bubinga Also known as African Rosewood, is harder and heavier than either Brazilian or Indian Rosewood, It has a medium texture with interlocking grain. It’s pinkish-mauve cast oxidizes to a nice brownish-red over time. See Wood Choices for Back & Sides See Alternative Wood Choices for Back & Sides See Anatomy of a Classical Guitar

Bugaku (Japanese) Japanese court dance

Bulbul tarang A banjo like instrument from India. made of a number of strings passing over what resembles a finger board. However, instead of directly fingering the keys, they are pressed with a series of keys rather like a piano. Sometimes the keys are similar to a piano keyboard, but more often they resemble typewriter keys

Bulerías festive type of Gypsy flamenco song and dance that originated Spain

Bull fiddle double bass

Burl A distinctive wood grain pattern. See Wood Choices for Back & Sides See Alternative Wood Choices for Back & Sides See Anatomy of a Classical Guitar

Burl Maple Burl is a wood grain pattern similar to marble. Maple is known for its figured grain, particularly “curly” or “flamed” wood exhibiting the tight even curls of “fiddleback” figure, as well as “birds-eye” and “quilted” or “blister” figure. European Maple is between Rock Maple and Bigleaf in hardness, and is fine and even-textured. Bigleaf Maple is a bit coarser and harder to work. It can range in color from ivory, to pink, to tan. Quilted Maple is the hardest to obtain. See Wood Choices for Back & Sides See Alternative Wood Choices for Back & Sides See Anatomy of a Classical Guitar

Burla (Italian) jest

Burlando (Italian) jestingly

Burlesca (Italian) jocular

Burlesco (Italian) jocular

Burlesque (Italian) jocular

Burletta (Italian) in a jocular manner

Burmese Rosewood An alternative wood for the back and sides of a classical guitar. See Wood Choices for Back & Sides See Alternative Wood Choices for Back & Sides See Anatomy of a Classical Guitar

Busk to improvise on preset harmonies

Busker a street performer; in music, a person who plays music on the street

Buyoo classical Japanese dance

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